Executive to Watch: Bob Gold

Gold Mobile provides customers with a unique cloud-based platform that focuses on enhancing companies' mobile ordering, payment and loyalty programs

Where do you think the most significant growth will occur in the company in the next few years? How will you manage that growth?

Significant growth will come from our health care business as our products are essential in reducing the costs of providing world-class care to patients when they are not in the hospital. The US health care system needs to better utilize technology in order to more efficiently utilize its physicians and other healthcare professionals.

We expect to double revenue in each of the next three years. The art of science of leading that effort is a combination of passion and process that balances sales, marketing, operations, and product development; if one of those elements is way ahead or behind the others it creates revenue stall.

How do you evaluate the implications of a decision in the present, near future and long term?

As a growth company a leading indicator of how well I am building a sustainable business and team is how much of my time is spent on short decisions that impact current operations….those decisions should come from our management team and employees. Therefore, when I am evaluating a decision based on short vs. long term, here are my 4 guiding principles:

  1. Does it leverage existing assets and increase revenue and gross margin?
  2. Does it reduce our cost of scaling operations and/or business development?
  3. Does it add to our company valuation and increase our Intellectual Property and competitive position?
  4. Would our clients think it is a good move?

What qualities/characteristics do you look for in members of your executive team?

In a high growth company, such as Gold Mobile, you need people with certain outlooks and personalities; here are a few of the top characteristics I look for:

  1. Do they truly believe in themselves?
  2. Do they believe in others? (and not just themselves)
  3. Do they enjoy executing strategies and rolling up their sleeves (do not want just people who like to think but not do)
  4. Do they view life as a journey and not a destination?
  5. How do you create a singular vision for your company?

With a lot of work and passion! Again, creating and sustaining a vision and applying it to everyday culture is a daunting task. I do it by purposely going out of my way to constantly talk to as many people in the company, at any level. A vision is not something that is done by a “committee,” it is the relentless pursuit of excellence around certain beliefs.

What are the three most pivotal moments of your career and what did you learn from them?

  1. When I worked for a small company as their global head of sales and marketing and it was sold for a lot of money; I realized then that I could do it and this set up my entrepreneurial career that has carried me through today
  2. When both my parents died 18 months apart it made me feel very exposed and “mortal” and it made me feel that business and life are intertwined…this set my path for taking my 20+ years of behavioral engagement experience as a “behavioral technologist” and apply it to health care to truly try and make a difference in people’s lives.
  3. When my last company had to suspend operations because we were across the street from the World Trade Center during 9/11 it taught me to really think every day about risk management, including everything from sales/market risk to operations and capital risk.
  4. What is GoMo and how will it change the way health care companies interact with patients?

GoMo Concierge Care is a behavioral science, method and technology platform that gets people with chronic and complex conditions to take actions that improve their health. GoMo is becoming the virtual version of physicians, nurses, case managers, and other health professionals as it enables them to deliver their voice of care to a variety of people at the same time.

What do you think should be the number one concern of health care executives when they think about how mobile technology can impact their business?

First, the biggest mistake health care executives make is viewing mobility patient engagement as a smaller and shorter form of online…so the website/portal becomes an app or is just made responsive to the device. People live their life in short moments throughout their day and we need to deliver quick insights and suggestions “in-the-moment” (like a golf caddy or concierge)…so I encourage health care executives to think how they are going to deliver a care plan to members or patients in “snackable bites”. I have worked for over 20 years to develop a fascinating science and have now implemented that vision in GoMo Concierge Care.